The Nice Attack: Be Careful What You Watch



So many times, too frequently to count, I strongly advise people to give themselves permission to stay away from media  after terrorist attacks. In reference to the attack in Nice on Bastille Day, my colleague and friend, Shane Owens,Ph.D., A.B.P.P.,  wrote this:

“The footage from this attack is unusually graphic, and it is raw and widely available. I logged into social media and was hit immediately with it without clicking the GIFs.

Seriously, this stuff is different. Be very careful about what you watch and what you click on when around those of tender age or sensibilities.

One last bit of advice, if I may: please limit your exposure to any media over the next couple of days. I have noticed that people who are usually unshaken by events like those we’ve seen in the past week or so are starting to let it get to them.”

It is extremely important that we protect ourselves and our loved ones, especially our children, from being indirect, but still very real victims, of any terrorist attack. I will heed Shane’s advice and I hope you, my dear friends, will do so, too.

Dr. Owens is a psychologist based in Suffolk County, New York, Board Certified in Behavioral and Cognitive Psychology. Follow him on Twitter @drshaneowens

Teens@Risk: The Dark Side Of Smartphones & Social Media



Photo courtesy of Fred Siebert via Flickr

Photo courtesy of Fred Siebert via Flickr

Your teen’s smartphone may not be as smart as you would like it to be. Teens today are presented with a world that did not exist that long ago. Giving your child a smartphone can introduce risks that you may not anticipate.

When teens open various apps such as KikMeetup or even Facebook, they could be inviting predators into their lives without realizing it. This can introduce cyberbullying, sextortion, blackmail and relationships that can become lethal. Yes, that means it could threaten their safety and ultimately their life.

Recently I was interviewed by a reporter who knew of my work with adolescent girls. In the article ‘Sextortion’ of girls can make smartphone as lethal as a gun, I’m quoted:

“It’s a very vulnerable age. They need attention. They are trusting. They want to feel loved,” Maleski said. “They also may feel like they’re in an adult relationship, so they feel mature and that they can handle it.”

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Postpartum Depression: What You & Your Doctor Should Know



PP Depression: It’s been around for a while.

New guidelines calling for pregnant women and women who recently gave birth to be screened for postpartum depression came out this week. Well it’s about time, I thought.

Honestly, I’m a bit confused that the frequency of postpartum depression is presented by the media as some kind of revelation. For ages it’s been known that the majority of new mothers report lowered mood after giving birth. The majority! Back in 2009, when I wrote “Bad Mommy! The Baby Blues & Postpartum Depression,” the Mayo Clinic reported as many as 80% of mothers said they experienced the baby blues and that postpartum depression occurred in 10-20% of women after giving birth. Today it’s like, Wow! a whole new finding that “one in eight and as many as one in five women” develop symptoms of postpartum depression. Which, btw, translates to 10-20%.

Whatever! When it comes to women’s health the sands of awareness and change are slow indeed! At least in this case we are going in the right direction.

“Depression is among the leading causes of disability in persons fifteen years and older. It affects individuals, families, businesses, and society and is common in patients seeking care in the primary care setting. Depression is also common in postpartum and pregnant women and affects not only the woman but her child as well.

The preamble to the latest recommendation statement from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is clear. It would be a good thing for medical professions who care for women to know about postpartum depression and make an assessment for it part of their routine exam.

Please, medical professionals, get some training in how to do this from a behavioral health professional! Sensitivity is just as important as a valid screening tool. Women may be reluctant to report their lowered mood because she ‘should be happy’ about her new baby. Anything less would be failure.

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Life, Love & Money



7027601297_5e90a918e2_zTo my great delight my friend Amy Jo Lauber, CFP® of Lauber Financial Planning, and I joined forces to co-write a bi-weekly column on the practical, spiritual and emotional challenges of personal finance. Here’s our inaugural article!

Dear Life, Love & Money: I’m so distracted by all of the terrible things going on in the world, how can I focus on money?

Amy Jo: I hear you, it is an enormous challenge to live for today while also being worried about what tomorrow may bring. Let us share some thoughts that may help you.

First, allow yourself some time to process and perhaps limit the information coming at you. Dr. Elvira Aletta recently tweeted “To the highly sensitive: it’s ok to turn off the tv, get off the websites, yes, even Twitter. Be kind to your heart & soul. #Paris”

Give yourself permission to experience the emotions that are a very real aspect of being human, and also give yourself permission to set them aside and move forward.

Dr. A: I agree with Amy Jo, taking a media break is an act of self-compassion, not avoidance…

To read the entire article click here!

Photo courtesy of Tax Credits

Stop Fighting Over Money & Enjoy Your Marriage!



Amy-Jo-Lauber-150x150Editor’s Note: My dear friend, Amy Jo Lauber, CFP, author of Life Inspired Financially Empowered, is holding a weekend retreat for couples! Of the big three reasons couples fight, sex, money and family, I have to say money was the usual suspect in our house. A retreat like the one Amy Jo has planned would have saved my husband and me a lot of tension and strife! Here is a reprint of an article written by Amy Jo describing the highlights of the retreat and why couples will benefit for the good of your bank account and your relationship!

~***~

It is booked! The “Couple’s Retreat for Financial Harmony” that I’m cheekily calling HARMONEY!

Since most couples argue (or at least disagree) about some aspects of their finances at least some of the time, I feel offering this retreat is a way of helping them stay married (if indeed they’d like to). Being a good steward of your resources is one way of showing love for your spouse.

Financial decisions and actions are reflections of our innermost values and priorities, so they tend to pull our triggers in ways we may not always understand. Once triggered, it’s difficult to listen to our spouse and step into a place of rational, wise decision making because we go into tantrum mode.

This is not healthy if you desire a long-term marriage and will only make you grumble at the “for richer or for poorer” vow you took. And what money-struggleabout “for worse?!” Who marries “for worse?!”

So, let’s make it “for better” and we’ll work on the “for richer” part, too.

This retreat is designed to be a sacred time and place for you and your beloved to:

  • Discover each other’s values, goals, fears and priorities
  • Foster a sense of understanding for each another
  • Learn how you complement each other financially
  • Increase your communication skills
  • Learn how to tackle your finances as a team
  • Create and commit to mutual goals & courses of action

Salsa SarahSarah Haykel (“Salsa Sarah”) will start us off Friday evening with a bit of fun, then Saturday I’ll help you discover what’s truly important to you – individually and as a couple – and how money can be your servant (and not the other way around).

Then Dr. Elvira Aletta of Explore What’s Next will give you the tools you need to communicate your needs and priorities to each other so that you can like each other and feel that you truly have each other’s back.

The retreat runs from Friday October 24th 6:30pm through Saturday October 25thth 4pm at the gorgeous Beaver Hollow Conference Center 1083 Pit Road, Java Center, NY 14082 (note this is a non-smoking facility).

$525 per couple: All meals and guest rooms included!
Make checks payable to Lauber Financial Planning, 3976 Seneca Street, West Seneca, NY 14224

Hey, Mom! Can You Handle The Truth?



IMG_1937A vacation, when we’re really lucky, gives a family the opportunity to bond, share old memories and make new ones. That was my hope for our recent family trip to the mountains.

Now that my kids are young adults, my son is twenty-one and my daughter 19, (Yikes!) I felt it was safe to ask them if my way of parenting worked for them when they were growing up. Of course I wouldn’t ask this question if I wasn’t fairly confident they would say, “You were a great mother! I wouldn’t change anything! When I have kids I’m going to rear them in exactly the same way!”

Ha! Woman plans and God laughs.

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5 Questions to Help Figure Out: Who is My Family?



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While we do not have a choice of the family we are born into, we can choose the people we call our family.

And that is okay!

Last night I was at dinner with my Dad and he introduced me to a man who he has known for a long time. As I talked with this man I noticed that he seemed sad. He was not sad about his life choices, he was sad about not having a relationship with his family. He felt betrayed by his family.

This left me thinking: What is family? Is it your “crazy” Uncle that makes everyone at dinner squirm and leaves you with your anxiety jumping from a 2 to a 10 within a matter of seconds? Or is it your best friend who calls and leaves you a voicemail, knowing you won’t pick up, because they know your day is filled with stress, but just wants you to know they are there for you.

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What To Do If Your Teen Is Cutting? Part ll



96776343_4efe3075ff_zEditor’s Note: In this post Dylan Broggio, LCSW, responds to questions many readers had about what to do if they know someone they love is cutting or if they are struggling with cutting themselves. 

Dylan Broggio, LCSW is a psychotherapist with Explore What’s Next. She specializes in work with adolescents, adults and families. If you would like to schedule a free consultation with Dylan call her at 734.474.6987 or email at dylan.broggio@gmail.com.

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Firstly, thank you all so much for the great comments, questions and support you have offered on my post “What To Do If Your Teen Is Cutting”. This article really struck a chord with our readers, so I thought I would answer some of the questions that have come up in this important conversation.

Question: “I just found out my child is cutting, how can I talk to them about their cutting without upsetting them and causing more cutting?”

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What To Do If Your Teen Is Cutting – Revisited



Editor’s Note: This article was written by Dylan Broggio, LCSW, EWN psychotherapist, quite a few years ago. “What To Do If Your Teen Is Cutting” is one of the most viewed articles on the Explore What’s Next blog. We knew this topic was important; what surprised us were the comments by readers who found recognition, validation and hope in Dylan’s article.

In the next week EWN will revisit the subject of cutting, first by presenting the original article once again. Then, in the next few days, EWN will post a new article by Dylan where she addresses the most pertinent comments to the first post. A few days after that you will see another new article by Kate Maleski, LCSW, Group Leader of the “Girls Take Charge” group, this time directed to teens.

If you find this series helpful in any way please leave a comment (the comment button to the right, just below  the title line) and share it with anyone you know who may be struggling with this issue.

~***~

6a00d83527e90e69e20134854de051970c-320piFinding out that someone you love is cutting themselves is very painful, shocking, information to hear. Being armed with information and a game plan can make all the difference in getting your loved one help. What is cutting? Cutting is when someone purposefully injures themselves, but is not trying to committing suicide. Essentially, cutting is a way to deal with pain. Teens and young adults report they cut in order to cope with or relieve emotional pain, or to “feel something” when all they feel is numb. Marks or cuts are typically kept well hidden so that they can continue this way of coping with their emotions.

14% of teens report engaging in self injurious behavior

64% of those teens are girls. (Ross and Heath, 2002)

If you suspect your teen is cutting here are some warning signs:

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Links For A Happy Thanksgiving Day



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Here are a few good sites to help enhance everyone’s enjoyment of the day:

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!!

Photo courtesy of Yeimaya

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